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Monday, December 30, 2013

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How To Water - Wine - Milk - Beer Chemistry Demonstration

Chemistry demonstrations in which solutions appear to magically change color leave a lasting impression on students and help instill an interest in science. Here's a color change demo in which a solution seems to change from water to wine to milk to beer simply be being poured into the appropriate beverage glass.
Difficulty: Average
Time Required: Prepare the solutions in advance; demo time is up to you

 

Here's How:

  1. First, prepare the glassware, since this demonstration relies on the presence of chemicals added to the glasses before the 'water' is added.
  2. For the 'water' glass: Fill the glass about 3/4 full of distilled water. Add 20-25 ml of saturated sodium bicarbonate with 20% sodium carbonate solution. The solution should have a pH = 9.
  3. Place a few drops of phenolphthalein indicator in the bottom of the wine glass.
  4. Pour ~10 ml saturated barium chloride solution into the bottom of the milk glass.
  5. Place a very small number of crystals of sodium dichromate into the beer mug. Up to this point, the set-up can be performed in advance of the demonstration. Just prior to performing the demo, add 5 ml concentrated HCl to the beer mug.
  6. To perform the demonstration, simply pour the solution from the water glass into the wine glass. Pour the resulting solution into the milk glass. This solution is finally poured into the beer mug.

Tips:

  1. Use goggles, gloves, and proper safety precautions when making the solutions and handling the chemicals. In particular, use caution with the conc. HCl, which can cause a serious acid burn.
  2. Avoid accidents! If you are using real drinking glasses, please reserve this glassware solely for this demonstration and take care that the prepared glassware is kept away from children/pets/etc. As always, label your glassware, too.

What You Need

  • distilled water
  • saturated sodium bicarbonate; 20% sodium carbonate ph=9
  • phenolphthalein indicator
  • saturated barium chloride solution (aqueous)
  • crystals of sodium dichromate
  • concentrated hydrochloric acid
  • water glass
  • wine glass
  • milk glass
  • beer mug

Valentine's Day Science Projects

Find a science project that is perfect for Valentine's Day! You can perform a color change reaction, make a chemical "beating heart", prepare a special Valentine gift, and more.

Printable Periodic Table of the Elements

Print or Download the Periodic Table 
The Periodic Table of the Elements is one of your best tools for working chemistry problems and making predictions about the properties of the elements. The online periodic table is useful since clicking on a symbol gives detailed element facts that you can't get on a single printed sheet of paper. However, it's really nice to be able to print out the table and move it around on your work space or write on it. Here are a few printable periodic tables for you. Each table prints out perfectly on a single 8-1/2" by 11" or standard printer paper page. Please feel free to download these to your computer, print them, and use them as hand-outs.
This color periodic table has circle tiles containing each element's atomic number, symbol, name and atomic weight.

Make Glowing Water

There are a couple of ways you get science projects to glow in the dark. You can use glow-in-the-dark paint, which is phosphorescent and glows anywhere from a few minutes to a few hours. Glowing paint or powder tends not to be very soluble, so it is good for some projects and not others. Tonic water glows very brightly when exposed to black light and is great for edible projects. Fluorescent dye is another option for a bright effect under a black light. You can extract non-toxic fluorescent dye from a highlighter pen to make glowing water:

  1. Use a knife to (carefully) cut a highlighter pen in half. It's a pretty simple steak knife and cutting board procedure.
  2. Pull out the ink-soaked felt that is inside the pen.
  3. Soak the felt in a small quantity of water. I made a video of what to expect.
Once you have the dye you can add it to more water to make glowing fountains, grow certain types of glowing crystals, make glowing bubbles, and use it for many other water-based projects.

The Difference Between Fluorine and Fluoride

First off, yes, it's fluorine and fluoride and not flourine and flouride. The mis-spelling is common, but the 'u' comes before the 'o'. Fluorine is a chemical element. Its anion, F-, or any of the compounds containing the anion are termed fluorides. When you hear about fluoride in drinking water, it comes from adding a fluorine compound (usually sodium fluoride, sodium fluorosilicate, or fluorosilicic acid) to drinking water, which dissociates to release the F- ion.

China-Japan tensions: Who has the smartest approach?

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's visit to a shrine honoring war criminals has aggravated tensions between Japan and China, prompting one expert to say Beijing is taking a 'smarter approach' to the strained relations between Asia's two biggest economies.
Tensions between the world's second and third largest economies have flared up in recent years following a territorial dispute over the East China Sea islands, which disrupted trade between the two nations. More recently, Beijing's introduction of an air defense zone has raised tensions further.
Abe's controversial visit to the Yasukuni shrine in Tokyo on Boxing Day provoked criticism from China, while the U.S. Embassy said it was "disappointed" with Japan's leadership.
"The leadership in China seems smarter on this one and more astute on this and recognizing what is going on more than Abe. Abe seems a little bit more wound up on this," said David Zweig, director of the center on China's Transnational Relations at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology.
Zweig said the U.S. government's decision to criticize Abe gave China a chance to "calm down and step back."
(Watch This: China-Japan island dispute: Is it worrying?)
"So it seems the Chinese are being a bit smarter on this, Abe is out on a limb a little bit here and I think the Chinese see that. They are thinking if the Americans are going to criticize him, let him dangle in the wind, that'd be a good thing," he added.
A resurgence of political tensions could threaten a recovery in trade relations between the two countries at a time when export numbers are all the more important for Japan amidst its ambitious plan to drag the economy out of over a decade of deflation.
Japanese exports to China recovered strongly in the first half of the year, recording an annual decline of only 0.6 percent, up from a 10.8 percent decline last year. From July to November, exports have surged to 18 percent.
The strong recovery in exports has given Abenomics a boost, but the prime minister faces a number of hurdles in 2014, including the planned consumption tax hike in April and the expected reduction in household spending as consumer prices tick upwards, which could derail his good work.

On This Day in Science History - December 30 - Robert Boyle

December 30th marks the passing of Robert Boyle. Boyle was an Irish chemist who made a significant contribution away from the alchemical idea of Aristotle's four elements to the atomic model of elements. He argued elements consisted of 'corpuscles' (atoms) instead of the four traditional elements of earth, air, fire and water. He also proposed nature could be broken down and described as a set of simple mathematical laws.

He also worked extensively with gases, especially with low pressure or 'rarefied airs' and vacuums. He demonstrated that vacuum can exist in nature, sound cannot travel though it, and animals cannot live without air. These experiments led to Boyle's ideal gas law where a gas at constant temperature will have changes in pressure inversely proportional to changes in volume containing the gas.

Boyle was also one of the founding members of the Royal Society that formed from a group of science and mathematically inclined people who met on a weekly basis in London and Oxford. He was elected president of the Society in 1680, but turned them down because the oath of office disagreed with his religious principles.

Guaranteed Scholarship Information

These are guaranteed scholarship money.
Just calculate your GPA in this format:
(Your GPA (as on transcript)*4)/ (maximum GPA in your educational system.)
For example:
In the HSC, if someone got 4.8, his GPA in 4.0 scale will be:
(4.8*4)/5=3.84
As for listed scholarships, just see if your score is equal or higher than the required scores of certain
university.
For example, one student will get full tuition scholarship in University of Alabama with a SAT score
of 1400 or above and a GPA of 3.5 or above (if got admitted). An additional scholarship of 2500 is
available in the University of Alabama if the student gets enrolled in the engineering school and
graduated with a STEM major. For that go to the website. If you have question about such
procedure. Ask in the comment box. I will try to response as soon as I can (remember I am not a
current undergrad students. I am applying this year)
Thanks.
University of Alabama
Award: Full Tuition
Residual COA: $13,122/year
Out-of-State Requirements: 3.5 GPA, 32 ACT or 1400 SAT (CR+M) In-State
Requirements: 3.5 GPA, 30 ACT or 1330 SAT (CR+M)
Website
Award: Full Tuition + $2,500/year
Residual COA: $10,622/year
Requirements (Eng/CS Only): 3.5 GPA, ACT 30 or 1330 SAT (CR+M)

Website
University of Alabama-Huntsville
Award: $15,750/year
Residual COA: $15,050/year (OOS), $3,500/year (In-State) Requirements:
4.0 GPA, 34 ACT or 1490 SAT (CR+M)
Website
University of Alabama-Birmingham
Award: $15,000/year (Full tuition for up to 25 credits per year)
Residual COA: Depends on number of hours taken Requirements:
3.0 GPA, 28 ACT
Website
Troy University
Award: Full Ride (Tuition+Room+Board)
Residual COA: $4,470/year
Requirements: 3.7 GPA, 31 ACT or 1380 SAT (CR+M)
Award: Full Tuition
Residual COA: $10,821/year
Requirements: 3.5 GPA, 27 ACT or 1220 SAT (CR+M)
Website
Alabama State University
Award: Full Ride (Tuition/Room/Board/Books+1,200/year)
Residual COA: $2,544/year
Requirements: 3.76 GPA, 28 ACT or 1230 SAT (CR+M)
Website
University of Arkansas-Little Rock
Award: Full Tuition+ ($10,000/year + OOS Tuition Waiver)
Residual COA: $11,997/year
Requirements: 3.0 GPA, 30 ACT or 1330 SAT (CR+M) website
University of Arkansas at Monticello
Award: Full Ride (Tuition+Room+Board)
Residual COA: $4,400/year
Requirements: 3.0 GPA and Top 10% Rank, 30 ACT
Award: Full Tuition+Room
Residual COA: $7,120/year
Requirements: 3.0 GPA, 27 ACT
Award: Full Tuition
Residual COA: $9,040/year
Requirements: 3.0 GPA, 24 ACT Website
University of Central Arkansas
Award: Full Tuition ($13,000/year)
Residual COA: $8,280/year
Requirement: 3.25 GPA, 31 ACT or 2020 SAT (CR+M+W) website
Southern Arkansas University
Award: Full Tuition+ ($11K/year)
Residual COA: $8,266/year
Requirement: 30 ACT website
Florida A&M
Award (In-State): Full Ride
Residual COA: $4,342/year
Award (OOS): Full Tuition and Fees
Residual COA: $13,096/year
Requirement: 3.5 GPA, 1800 SAT (CR+M+W) or 27 ACT website
Indiana-Purdue Fort Wayne
Award: Full Tuition
Residual COA: $13,622/year
Requirement: 32 ACT (including writing) or 2100 SAT (CR+M+W) website
Northern Illinois University
Award: $23,500/year
Residual COA: $12,021/year (OOS), $3,128/year (In State) Requirements:
3.75 GPA or Top 5% Class Rank, 33 ACT
Website
Western Illinois University
Award: $10,000 + room
Residual COA: $9,420/year (OOS), $5,144/year (In State)
Requirements: 3.5 GPA, 32 ACT or 1420 SAT (CR+M) website
Morningside College
Award: Full Tuition
Residual COA: $9,820/year
Requirements: 3.9 GPA, 31 ACT
Louisiana Tech University
Award: Full Ride (tuition, fees, and on-campus regular dorm and meals for four years)
Residual COA: $5,229/year
Requirements: 3.0 GPA, 32 ACT or 1400 SAT (CR+M)
University of Louisiana-Monroe
Award: Full Ride
Residual COA: $2,889/year
Requirements: 3.0 GPA, 31 ACT or 1360 SAT (CR+M) website
Southeastern Louisiana University
Award: ~Full Tuition ($6,500-$7,000 + OOS tuition waiver)
Residual COA: $9,628/year
Requirements: 3.0 GPA, 30 ACT
Website
Coppin State University
Award: Full Ride
Residual COA: $4,085/year
Requirements: 3.2 GPA, 1820 SAT (CR+M+W)
Award: Full Tuition
Residual COA: $12,103/year
Requirements: 3.0 GPA, 1590 SAT (CR+M+W) website
University of Mississippi (Ole Miss)
Award (OOS): Approximately 90% Tuition (Currently $15K/year, may not increase to match future
tuition increases)
Residual COA: $17,010/year
Requirements: 3.0 GPA, 32 ACT/1400 SAT (CR+M)
Award (In State): Approximately 80% Tuition (Currently $5K/year, may not increase to match future
tuition increases)
Residual COA: $16,526/year
Requirements: 3.0 GPA, 32 ACT/1400 SAT (CR+M)
Website
Jackson State University
Award: Full Ride (Tuition, Room, Board, Fees, Books)
Residual COA: $3,300/year
Requirements: 3.5 GPA, 27 ACT
Award: Full Ride (Tuition, Room, Board)
Residual COA: $4,100/year
Requirements: 3.0 GPA, 25 ACT
Award: Full Tuition
Residual COA: $10,594/year
Requirements: 3.0 GPA, 22 ACT
Website
Southeast Missouri State University
Award: Full Ride (Tuition+Room+Board)
Residual COA: $3,895/year
Requirements: 3.9 GPA, 33 ACT or 1440 SAT (CR+M)
Award: Full Tuition
Residual COA: $11,610/year
Requirements: 3.6 GPA, 28 ACT or 1250 SAT (CR+M) website
Missouri State University
Award: $5,000 + OOS tuition waiver (=~85% of OOS tuition)
Residual COA: $12,580/year
Requirements: 3.9 GPA or top 10% class rank, 28 ACT or 1250 SAT (CR+M) or IB diploma website
Ohio University
Award (In State): Full Tuition
Residual COA: $13,407/year
Requirements: 3.0 GPA, 32 ACT or 1400 SAT (CR+M)
Award (OOS): $6,000 + In-State Tuition (=~85% of OOS Tuition)
Residual COA: $16,371/year
Requirements: 3.0 GPA, 32 ACT or 1400 SAT (CR+M) website
Wayne State College
Award: Full Tuition
Residual COA: $9,580/year
Requirement: 30 ACT website
North Carolina Central University
Award: Full Ride+ (Tuition and fees, room, board, books, $1000/year, internships and a laptop)
Residual COA: $1,175/year
Requirement: 3.5 GPA, 29 ACT or 1900 SAT (CR+M+W)
Website
Newberry College
Award: Full Ride (Tuition, Fees, Room, and Board)
Residual COA: $3,500/year
Requirement: 3.5 GPA, 32 ACT or 1400 SAT (CR+M)
Website
Winthrop University
Award: ~Full Tuition ($14,000/year in-state, $24,000/year OOS)
Residual COA: $11,564/year
Requirement: 4.0 GPA, 35 ACT or 1500 SAT (CR+M)
Website
Columbia College
Award: Full Tuition
Residual COA: $11,438/year
Requirement: 29 ACT or 1300 SAT (CR+M)
Lee University
Award: Full Tuition
Residual COA: $10,944/year
Requirements: 32 ACT or 1410 SAT (CR+M)
Website
Texas State University
Award: Full Tuition ($8,000/year + OOS tuition waiver)
Residual COA: $11,814/year
Requirements: Top 15% Rank or IB Diploma, 32 ACT or 1400 SAT (CR+M)
Website
Prairie View A&M University
Award: Full Ride (Tuition, Fees, Room, Books)
Residual COA: $5,324/year
Requirements: 3.5 GPA, 1760 SAT (CR+M+W) or 26 ACT (including W)
Award: Full Tuition+ ($9,200/year + OOS Tuition Waiver)
Residual COA: $9,526/year
Requirements: 3.25 GPA, 1650 SAT (CR+M+W) or 24 ACT (including W)
Website
Utah Valley University
Award: Full Tuition
Residual COA: $12,700/year
Requirements: 3.9 GPA, 1980 SAT (CR+M+W) or 30 ACT website

সরকারি খরচে প্রশিক্ষণ পাবে পাঁচ লাখ তরুণ

তথ্য ও যোগাযোগ প্রযুক্তি -নির্মাণশিল্প -লাইট -ইঞ্জিনিয়ারিং -জাহাজ নির্মাণ শিল্প -চামড়া ও পাদুকাশিল্প -ট্যুরিজম অ্যান্ড হসপিটালিটি: অ্যাগ্...

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